Join the Year Long Meditation

In a world full of unrest, fear, and doubt, we need to reconnect with our inner light now more than ever. 

Join thousands of like-minded practitioners in an unprecedented effort to reshape the course of human history.

Year Long Meditation  (YLM) is a global group practice, undertaken to heal and empower collective consciousness. With three ways to participate from anywhere in the world – and a global community of vibrant, mindful people working toward a common goal – you’ll have the tools and support to make a lasting, positive impact on yourself and society.

To learn more and to join the Year Long Meditation  please go to 

https://www.himalayaninstitute.org/year-long-meditation/#/

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Costa Rica Yoga Retreat 2020

with Kate Mackin at the Goddess Garden Center
February 29- March 6th 2020   

Special Informational Pre-Meetings Tues July 23rd at 7 pm and Thursday the 25th at 2 pm!               

 

A Spring Retreat focused on
The Chakras

Join us to:

CONNECT WITH NATURE- This retreat is designed to help us remember our true nature, our essence. Join us to feel in harmony with nature, practice and learn in a beautiful setting.

EVALUATE YOUR CURRENT CIRCUMSTANCES- Our lives are busy and many times our habits don’t serve us but they are such an entrenched part of our daily lives that we don’t have the distance to even see them. This retreat will help you take a step back and re-evaluate your life situations and give you space and training to respond new ways.

RECEIVE SUPPORT TO CREATE HEALTHY HABITS- We start each day with meditation and asana class. We also spend time learning about the Chakras the Subtle Body and how they can support healthy functioning. There will be plenty of time for relaxation, exploration and introspection. Nourish yourself with fresh, healthy meals. Leave the retreat with ideas to incorporate into your daily routines at home.

FIND HEALING- Spring is the perfect time for renewal. Restore your mental, physical and emotional health. Take the time to process and release old patterns that aren’t serving you anymore.



 

Early registration until December, 2019
$1700 Single Occupancy (waiting list)
$1400 Double Occupancy
$1300 Triple Occupancy
$1200 Dorm

Registration until February 1st, 2020
$1800 Single Occupancy (waiting list)
$1500 Double Occupancy
$1400 Triple Occupancy
$1300 Dorm

Each participant receives a private Ayurvedic Health Consultation. Includes accommodations and tuition. Does not include Travel.

This retreat’s focus is “The Chakras:  Wheels of life”

 

You may have heard about the chakras in your yoga class, on television or even from your friends. Join us to learn more about the subtle energy centers in your body and how they influence our emotions, thought processes and even the physical body.  This retreat will cover the theory behind the chakras and also explore different yoga  practices that help us connect and balance them.  These practices will provide needed healing and the empowerment to make a lasting change.  We will also take a closer look at ourselves and our lifestyle, finding ways to create more harmony in ourselves and the way we connect with the world around us.

Sample Daily Schedule:

6:30 Meditation
7-8 am Hatha class
Breakfast
Time for Excursions or Relaxation
Lunch
3-5 pm Ayurvedic Health Consultations
Afternoon- Free time to explore or relax
 5-6 pm Yin Yoga
 Dinner
 7-9 pm Lecture and Discussion

Times may change depending on the retreat’s centers meal schedule. More exact times are coming soon!

Kate Mackin, E-RYT 500, Ayurvedic Health Counselor

Kate serves as President on the Board of Directors for the Himalayan Institute of Pittsburgh and is a Yoga Alliance Continuing Education Provider.  Drawing from the Himalayan Tradition, she blends yogic and Ayurvedic techniques to promote wellness on all levels.  Kate enjoys leading corporate seminars and retreats in and out of the country.  She also works with athletes to optimize peak efficiency and students, teaching them mindfulness and yoga practices that they can carry with them throughout their lives.

 

Costa Rica Room Selection



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3 Wisdom Traditions – Wellness Coach Learning Lab with Kathryn Templeton

Friday, August 16, 2019 – 06:00 to Sunday, August 18, 2019 – 03:00
Event Presenter(s): 
Kathryn Templeton
Locations: 
Himalayan Institute of Pittsburgh
500 Beverly Road
Pittsburgh, PA 15216
United States
Price: 
$349
Event Description: 
An affordable and accessible Wellness Coach Certification Program that Integrates the Sciences of Yoga, Ayurveda and Psychology – earn Yoga Alliance, NAMA and NASW CE credits

This training is for anyone who works in the fields of mental health, ayurveda, or yoga, and for anyone who simply wants to explore the therapeutic applications of these three powerful healing disciplines. With a better understanding of all three fields, you can create comprehensive treatment plans to more fully support yourself or others. Plus, if you’ve been wanting to explore or grow a profession in the wellness arena, this training is the first step toward becoming a certified 3 Wisdom Traditions Wellness Coach!

Event Description: 

To sustain healthy functioning we need resilience, adaptability and interpersonal support. Everyone has challenges in life and sometimes needs support to manage these challenges. Often, the tools of yoga therapy, ayurvedic medicine and traditional clinical psychotherapy are called upon to bring us back into balance in our true nature.

The 3 Wisdom Traditions (3WT) training is designed to support your recovery from imbalances with a wrap around treatment plan to support you as you work toward self-evolution, or support your client in between sessions as you work on clinical issues.

Creating a baseline of support is critical. Building practices to build resilience and adaptability, along with attachment for healthy relationships and communities are what the 3 Wisdom Traditions Wellness Coaches are trained to do.

Step 1 is Core Concepts, online from Yoga International for 11.5 CEUs for $249

  • Explore how yoga is a bridge to ayurveda and learn about the concept of agni (internal heat or fire) and how it affects you physically, mentally, and emotionally.
  • See how ayurveda can work conceptually and pragmatically with psychological tools offered in the areas of self-regulation, adaptability, and resiliency.
  • Explore the roots of Western and Eastern psychology and how they relate to each other and the modern world.
  • Learn more about how we experience trauma, and why people respond differently to the same traumatic event.
  • Gain an understanding of psychological, yogic, and ayurvedic terms to help you better get to know each discipline and how they relate to each other.   

Step 2 is the 3WT Learning Lab in Pittsburgh,  15 CEUs in person for $349

Step 3 (can be done before or alongside Step 2) Enjoy the 3WT Mentoring Program – listen to case studies from 3WT Wellness Coaches, presenting cases for discussion and mentoring with Kathryn Templeton.

Schedule: 

6-9pm Friday

11am-6pm Saturday – (break at 3:00-3:45) 

11am-3pm Sunday 

How to register: 

www.hipyoga.org

About this Presenter: 

Kathryn Templeton, MA, RDT/MT, E500RYT, AYT, C-IAYT, and Ayurveda Practitioner was voted Editors Choice for 100 Trailblazers in Yoga & Ayurveda from Spirituality & Health Magazine.

She has devoted her life to the health of others. A psychotherapist for more than 30 years, Kathryn is a Master Teacher in the field of Drama Therapy and continues to work both clinically and as an educator specializing in the treatment of individuals with anxiety, depression and complex trauma. As an E-500 RYT, NAMA-registered Ayurvedic practitioner and Senior Para Yoga teacher, Kathryn has worked to develop specialized treatments integrating the principles of yoga, ayurveda and clinical psychology. Kathryn is currently a faculty member at the Himalayan Institute in Honesdale, PA. She is founder of the Himalayan Institute Ayurvedic Yoga Specialist program (HIAYS), Torchbearer Mentorship program, and their AHC Program. Kathryn just launched The Three Wisdom Traditions: Integrating yoga,psychology and Ayurveda forProfound Healing. She is an Adjunct Professor of Human Development and General Psychology in the Connecticut Community College system. Kathryn is a contributing writer, and educator for Yoga International website, a Banyan Botanicals Ambassador, and a guest blogger on several healthcare websites. She holds memberships with the International Association of Yoga Therapists, Yoga Alliance, the National Association of Drama Therapists and the National Ayurvedic Medical Association.

What to Bring: 

Your texts and notes from Core Concepts

Contact Information: 

Info@hipyoga.org or 

Click here to fill out the contact form for Three Wisdom Traditions Core Concepts

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New Hatha Yoga Class for Men with Susan Volkar

Yoga Sequences designed specifically for men

Weekly Class

Begins Monday, May 6th

from 6:30 – 7:45 pm

Here are a few reasons why men should do yoga:

  • Extends range of motion
  • Helps build muscles
  • Increases flexibility
  • Enhances productivity
  • Is a stress reliever
  • Improves sexual health
  • Improves breathing
  • Alleviates pain and injuries
  • Helps improve overall health
  • Helps to sleep better
  • Creates a balanced body and mind


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Ayurveda Share

June 11th 1-2 pm

No Charge!

Ayurveda is a vast science but can be implemented in small steps in your daily

life. Even these small steps can start to move your towards wellness and have a

big impact. Join us for this monthly gathering to ask questions and build your

experiences with Ayurveda. We will have different experienced Ayurvedic

professionals available at each share to talk about seasonal changes, answer your

questions and offer ideas and strategies to help you feel healthier and happier!

These shares will be held on a monthly basis and will we will rotate between day

and evening times to make them available to people with different schedules.

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Stealing from Myself by Bev Gray

Last night I taught my usual Tuesday night yoga class, the one I’ve been teaching now for a year and a half. It’s typically a small class, with some regulars and some drop-in’s who attend intermittently. The pace is even and the asanas are mildly challenging.

For the past couple weeks, some of the students attending this class have been teacher trainees from another yoga studio; part of their training encourages them to go to different studios and experience different styles (very cool, I must say).

Last night’s visiting attendees were two women: one instructor and one trainee. Both were young and energetic, the instructor thin and lithe, her upper body overlaid with colorful tattoos. Her asanas were nearly perfect and lovely to watch.

Like most instructors, I’m sure, I always feel a little intimidated when an instructor shows up for my class; feeling not so much that I’m being judged, but watched. Very carefully. I do the same when I attend a fellow teacher’s class. I’m not judging, but always searching. Searching for new ways to explain a pose or inspire students (or myself). I recognize that my style is mine, that theirs is theirs, and that instructors can’t be compared. I have tremendous respect for all teachers. What intimidates me, however, is knowledge.

Yoga is so deep and vast that when I meet other teachers (especially if they practice a different style), I am always overwhelmed at how much I DON’T know. I am suddenly reduced to a student, a child seeking approval, feeling inadequate.

“No, I don’t remember what my dosha is.”

“No, I’ve never practiced ashtanga yoga (at least I don’t think I have).”

“Nope, never heard of the hasta or the pada bandhas.”

“No, I haven’t read the Bhagavad Gita from beginning to end.”

“No, I can’t do a handstand or hold a hip balance with straight arms and legs for more than a few breaths.”

“No, I don’t make a habit of adjusting my students.”

Cerebrally, I know that we are never “done” when it comes to yoga; that the depth of this practice is vast and never-ending. So why do I feel so less-than when I discover something I don’t know? And how do I release the self-judgement for not knowing everything about something which is fundamentally unknowable?

As always, I look to the Yamas and Niyamas for guidance. The Yamas and the Niyamas are the first two limbs of the 8-Fold path of yogic philosophy. Taken from the Yoga Sutras, there are five Yamas, or restraints, and five Niyamas, or observances.

For this particular experience, Astaya, the Yama of non-stealing, spoke to me. According to Deborah Adele, in her book, The Yamas and the Niyamas, “Astaya guides our attempts and tendencies to look outwardly for satisfaction.” In looking outward, we are stealing our joy and ability to look inward. Astaya asks us to shift our awareness of others to ourselves.

So in looking inward, I can appreciate how far I’ve come, without the distraction of comparing myself to others; because comparing either leaves you feeling dejected or superior, and neither is a healthy alternative. And often what we reach for is not necessarily what we want, but what may look good at the time. In our culture, we have much to compete with. There are pretty little baubles, bangles and beads in front of us wherever we go. If we keep reaching out for things just because they are there, we aren’t fulfilling our truth.

I don’t see myself as a teacher, really, but a guide. I share what I know and take in what my students teach me. I don’t feel I will ever be one of those instructors that people seek out, revered as a master in my field. I work full-time, have a family, so my ability (and let’s face it, energy) to study and immerse myself are limited. But I love my class and my students and take the moments I do have very seriously.

No, I am not trained in Ayurveda. No, I can’t twist my 49 year-old body into asanas that a tattooed twenty-something can do. And yes, there is an enormous amount of knowledge yet to be discovered. Astaya encourages me to “be where I am,” appreciate the journey and discover where I really want to go.

Oh, and I don’t have any tattoos. Just sayin’.

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Mindfulness and Yoga in Schools – Faculty Training

WHEN: August 5 – 9 (Mon – Fri) from 1-5 pm

WHERE: 300 Beverly Road Pittsburgh, PA 15216 (412) 344-7434

PROGRAM COST: $500

The Himalayan Institute of Pittsburgh is committed to serving schools and educational facilities. We provide support to educators and students by offering yoga and mindfulness training in different modules. This program is designed to help teachers understand how the breathing and relaxation exercises affect physiology and how to teach them to their students.

Students feel better and perform better when they have techniques to manage stress and anxiety. Join us to learn how to bring these techniques into your classroom. This program includes:

  • A framework to understand the objectives of mindfulness and yoga
  • Breath Training – Understand how it brings balance to the system and how to teach it
  • Movement – Learn to lead a class through basic movements
  • Relaxation Techniques – Learn the components and how to teach them


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Monthly Community Meditation

Our Himalayan Institute of Pittsburgh is a peaceful community, welcome to all. In these turbulent times…let us come together, drop within and meditate…or maybe you have never meditated? You could simply sit in silence. Let’s create a positive energy that will promote peace and carry us throughout our world.

Our Summer Community Meditations:

The 2nd Friday of each Month

Dates:  July  12th,  August 8th,  September 13th

~No Fee

~Time: 7pm – 8pm.

Door will be open at 6:30.

It’s simple.   We just come and “sit” together in the beauty of silence. If you have even the slightest interest, please come and “sit” with us.

You can use a chair, or come early and learn to prop for ease in sitting.  You can stay for 5 minutes.  You can stay the hour. 

We provide chairs, mats, bolsters and blankets for your support.

 

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Beginner’s Yoga

Beginners Image

Sunday Evenings  7:30 – 8:45 pm with Jennie Bolas
Ongoing: please come anytime and use your class pass

More and more people are discovering the benefits of yoga.  Whether you are interested in flexibility, strength, stress reduction or balance, it helps to learn the fundamentals of yoga in a systematic, non-threatening way.

This class will cover the basics of breath awareness and different types of yoga postures (asanas).  Throughout the session we will encourage a healthy connection between breath and posture, increasing body awareness, and ease in movement.  The class will also explore relaxation techniques to increase your sense of well being and balance.


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Chyawanprash Cookies

From the Himalayan Institute

1 cup butter (2 sticks)
2 cups dark brown sugar
2 eggs
1 jar of Chyawaprash

5 cups white flour
3 tsp. baking soda
1 tsp. Salt
1/2 tsp. Ginger root powder

Raw Sugar

Directions: Pre-heat oven at 350

1. In mixer, cream together butter & brown sugar then add eggs (one at a time). Blend well then add chyawanprash. Use a knife to get it out of the jar.

2. Combine flour, baking soda, ginger and salt; gradually add to the wet ingredients until blended well. Use a spoon to scoop into a medium size ball. Dip one side in raw sugar and place on a lined cookie sheet, sugar side up. Bake for 10-12 minutes.

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